Category Archives: IL models

ACRL release part two of draft Framework for Information Literacy Standards

Association of College & Research LibrariesThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has now released the second part of a draft Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education, which is intended to replace the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (ILCSHE) that were adopted by ACRL in 2000.

Part one was made available in February 2014. The second part of the draft framework includes two additional threshold concepts.

ACRL is welcoming feedback on both parts of the document until 15th April 2014. You also have the opportunity to participate in two online open forums that are taking place in early April. Registration is required in advance.

ACRL will make revisions as a result of the feedback received, and will release a second draft of the framework in early June.

More information on the new framework, including the draft documents, is available from the ACRL website.

ACRL release draft Framework for Information Literacy Standards

Association of College & Research Libraries

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has released the first part of a draft Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education, which is intended to replace the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (ILCSHE) that were adopted by ACRL in 2000.

The Competency Standards have become an essential document related to the emergence of information literacy as a recognized learning outcome at many Higher Education institutions in the USA. The ACRL describes them as having “defined information literacy for librarians, educators, and assessment agencies for more than a decade”. As with all ACRL standards, the Competency Standards are reviewed on a cyclical basis. In June 2012, the ACRL Board approved a unanimous recommendation that they be significantly revised.

The first part of the draft Framework includes:

  • Introduction
  • Three Threshold Concepts
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography

The second part of the draft is expected to be released in April 2014, and will include:

  • Additional Threshold Concepts
  • Sample Scenarios

ACRL is welcoming feedback on both parts of the document until 15th April 2014.

More information on the new Framework, including the draft document, is available from the ACRL website.

UK IL models and the ACRL IL competency standards

Want an update on what is happening in the UK in relation to IL models?  Then read Justine Martin’s report which highlights four UK models of Information Literacy and compares them with the ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards.  Martin, J. L. (2013) “Learning from Recent British Information Literacy Models: A Report to ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force.”  Mankato, US. http://mavdisk.mnsu.edu/martij2/acrl.pdf

Three spheres of Information Literacy by Geoff Walton

I introduced the controversial ‘Three spheres of information literacy’ theory at LILAC in 2010 and gave my own interpretation of their relative importance as observed from my research. This year at LILAC I asked delegates who attended my talk (20) to note how they viewed the three spheres see http://www.flickr.com/photos/humpydemon/ for pics. I then asked lis-infoliteracy subscribers the same question and received 63 responses.  Before I tell you the results I’ll just remind you what the ‘3 spheres’ are and the theory that goes with it (bear with me it is very brief):

Three Spheres of Information Literacy by Geoff Walton
Three Spheres of Information Literacy by Geoff Walton

These spheres should be viewed as overlapping and interlocking with each becoming become more or less important depending on the context.

 The underlying theory is:

Becoming information literate appears to be about an individual completing a task in a given context. This context leads to the interaction with sources (e.g., databases, e-journals, books, e-books, peer and tutors etc) and in so doing brings about the interplay of an individual’s behavioural, cognitive, metacognitive and affective states.  It is this interplay which determines the level of new knowledge learnt (or produced or both) and the degree of changed behaviour (i.e., level of information literacy – the interplay of the 3 spheres: (1) Use/communicate/ produce/, (2) find/access/locate, (3)evaluate/discern) exhibited.

 The results

(1)    LILAC presentation (the pilot study)

Delegates were aked to use post-it notes to show their preference (green for most important, amber for second and pink for third) and stick them on a flip chart see pictures by Ruth Stubbings (link above)

  • Evaluate  – most important 13, second 7 and third 1
  • Use – most important 6, second 12, and third 3
  • Find – most important 2, second 2 and third 17

This seems to be a clear indicator that those delegates (entirely self-seleting and unrepresentative) viewed evaluating information as the most important sphere and find the least so.

 (2)    Lis-infoliteracy subscribers

In all 63 list members replied (about 4% of all subscribers).  Of those, a total of 61 respondents stated an order of preference.  There were 6 possible permutations from which to choose, I have put the percentages by each.

  • 123 – 34%
  • 132-  5%
  • 231 – 28%
  • 213 – 25%
  • 312 – 5%
  • 321 – 3%

In summary 53% of respondents who stated a preference put 2 (Evaluate) first, 39% stated 1 (Find) first and 8% put 3 (Use) first.

 Interestingly, of those who responded before 12 noon on Monday (about half of all respondents), a clear majority (64%) put 2 (Evaluate) first.  After 12 noon Monday this declined to 40%. By Tuesday morning this decreased to 33% in favour of 1 (Find).  What is all that about I wonder?

Those who participated, particularly those who felt they could not state an order, had some very interesting points to make about my ‘survey’, the relationship between the three spheres and other issues regarding IL, especially teaching.

This article was kindly writte for the IL website and infoliteracy discussion list by Geoff Walton, Senior Researcher (0.5) in the Institute for Applied Creative Thinking (I-ACT), Staffordshire University.